The Horsey Part of the Equation

Last night, as I got changed at work for my lesson, I realized I was missing one of the most important part of my riding wardrobe… a sport bra. Damn… At first, I was debating what to do. Do I try to run home and get one, putting me half an hour behind schedule at LEAST? Do I ride without one?ย  Do I wrap my chest in a polo wrap?!

In the end, I realized that it was probably a great opportunity to give May another pro ride. While warm last night, there was a good breeze that kept it from being ungodly hot, and Mandy has set up a new course in the arena. On top of that, it has been more than two months since she has sat on my horse, and as we are looking at some bigger heights (for us), I wanted to get her opinion on where May’s confidence/ability really was.

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Lucky for me, Mandy was happy to hop on and put May through her paces. Of course… May first decided to try to run away as she was getting on… which was met with a reminder that, “unicorns don’t run away with their riders.” That got a quick correction, dismount, remount. And then… May proceeded to be pretty spicy warming up.

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Sassy Tail Swish

As a result, they started with an exercise that I have actually done quite a bit with May, but not in a while. They looped back and forth over a vertical with a placing pole 9.5′ behind the jump. The idea was two fold, get May to rock back over fences, and get her to take the cue on what lead to land on. The first few times, she tried to blow through the half half and required a solid halt and back, but then they got into a rhythm.

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They moved onto a full course, and honestly, May just popped around like she had jumped that course a thousand times. Was it perfect? No. Mandy puts a lot more pressure on May to be straight and adjustable (vs. me just trying to get out of the damn way). When May softened and listened, the jumps were smooth and easy. When she locked up like a donkey, the distances weren’t as nice.

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The left turn to this oxer apparently meant that outside aids and half halts meant nothing.ย 

Eventually, we pushed the yellow and black oxer up to closer to training height, as she was consistently nailing the bending five to that jump. Mandy wanted to give her a bit of confidence over a slightly bigger height without pushing her too much over a fence that they weren’t 100% agreeing on.

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You mean a left turn PAST the gate??

At the same time, Mandy also mentioned that she was going to jump the chevron. My response? “She’s never jumped the chevrons so… just steer.” Like… yes… my pro rider is definitely going to steer to the narrow chevron jump… Luckily, Mandy humors me and allows me to pretend like I am helpful.

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Mandy “You need to take off at the base.” May “Hold my beer”

The full video is below. Of course, the very first jump didn’t come up quite the way Mandy wanted it to. However, May still easily moved forward down the five line to the larger oxer and popped over it. The rest of the course went super well, so they just repeated the last line one more time, and they nailed it. You can see both courses at the bottom of this post, but I just had to share the last line they did.

Overall, I got some really good feedback from Mandy. She’s definitely not as finished as she needs to be to do a full course at Novice height. Mandy pointed out that she probably could get around, but it might rock her confidence, which is just so important. She said that, for right now, our goal should be to fix the straightness/balance issues at the height where May can “figure it out” when it goes wrong, and then move May up when she is a bit more reliable. However, it’s not that she has any difficulty with the Novice height, but we don’t want her to start feeling like her job is hard or not fun. I couldn’t agree more and am so thankful to have a pro that enjoys my “spicy dijon” pony.

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May Gets a Pro Ride

My pro has ridden May all of twice before this week. The first time was to disentangle whatever was going on with our right rein on the flat. (That post is over here, in case you missed it.) Then… when I fell off going through that grid a few weeks ago (that post is here), I threw my pro up for her first ever jump school on May.

Since then, things have been chugging along, but we have definitely moved from May’s 100% comfort zone (2’3″ – 2’7″) and are starting to flirt with heights that she is considerably greener at.ย Then, on Monday, I managed to tweak a tendon in my ankle while getting on and off my horse 1,000xs while trying saddles. So… it seemed like the perfect time to throw the pro up.

I guess the method to my madness is two fold. 1 – I wanted to see how a stronger, more confident ride, helped May stay straighter and better over slightly larger fences. AND 2 – I wanted to get my trainer’s thoughts on my saddle.

Honestly, It was a great idea. The biggest comment? May is a HECK OF A LOT fitter now then she was last time she got on. It’s amazing what a month of fitness work can do. Annnnnd my saddle isn’t terrible, but it doesn’t do me any favors. It’s hard to sit in without getting “stuck” in it.

Random still shot of our Skinny Legend

Her schooling mostly followed my lesson from last week, but with the jumps set a bit higher. Honestly, she came across a lot of the same issues too. May really wants to just pop through that right shoulder, especially coming away from home. The difference is that NT is strong enough and quick enough to insist on the adjustment without causing major issues. AND is brave enough to keep riding forward when stuff doesn’t go 100% perfectly.

I have a ton of media, but most of it is for me. Either way, I feel like the below sums up the whole schooling. May really wanted to fall through her inside shoulder around the corner. NT corrects it and rides forward. The distance comes up long due to the argument around the corner, but NT keeps the positive ride, stays balanced, keeps May’s front end up, and it turns out great.

Super excited to get back on the mare and give it a go myself next week!