“Real Eventing” & Imposter Syndrome

Apologies in advance for a rather rambly, stream of consciousness post.

Riding at the horse park for our competition was a bit surreal. Spring Bay is a bit of a unique horse trial in a lot of ways. Obviously, running XC at a different venue than SJ and Dressage is interesting, but it is more than that.

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As we walked from the trailers to Dressage or SJ at the horse park, you could see the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event coming together. Crews worked to build tents and platforms around Rolex Stadium. The grass on the XC field was being mowed and tended to. Even the barns not being used for our event were cleaned and prepped, ready for the 5* horses to show up.

It’s easy enough to go to a schooling show, especially in eventing, and feel like you belong. Most everyone is on either an OTTB or a QH or a mutt of some kind. (sorry May). It’s pretty rare to see the newest or the best tack/equipment etc on the school ponies poking around baby starter. If you go often enough, you get to know most of the riders/trainers/horses on sight.

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So I have gotten… pretty comfortable in that atmosphere.

Then a couple of weeks ago, I ventured to the Kentucky Horse Park, as it preps for KY3DE, my over-sized thelwell pony siting in the trailer, ready for Starter. I watched the Prelim riders perform their long and complicated Dressage tests (to me anyway). I walked the SJ course when it included 3 combinations, a triple bar, and was set to full prelim height. Thinking back on it, it was the first time I have ever been in a competition ring with jumps set to that height.

Then I picked up on the chatter, which horses were just out to do the CT to start off their season, and which horses were stepping down for a confidence building start. Confidence building?!

So the feelings started to creep in. This wasn’t really eventing. Who was I to call myself an eventer? Even a recent article on Eventing Nation seemed to acknowledged it:

I think we should respect the person that chooses to compete at Novice because that’s where they are happy and are enjoying the sport just as much as the person who is running around Kentucky.

Against the Move Up Mentality 

HAH! NOVICE?! Girl, those BN jumps look big right now. Did this person purposefully skip the very lowest levels of our sport? The levels that run multiple divisions in nearly every event and help pay for the judges, venues, secretaries etc etc etc? I like to think not…

I have told myself for years that getting to Novice would be really eventing, but the truth is, a couple of weeks ago, me and my horse went to compete three times in three different phases. And we were competent and competitive in each phase. To me, that is eventing.

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And you know what? I had FUN! By Sunday, I was eyeing the BN XC fences with excitement instead of anxiety. (May still thinks it would have been WAY MORE fun to “gallop” through the mud over the bigger fences.)

So I look my own doubts head on, and I remind them that being an eventer and a horseperson means showing off your horse to the best of your abilities in that moment. My choice to run Starter doesn’t need any explanation beyond the choice to set myself and my horse up for success. In fact, it needs FAR LESS explanation then anyone who pushes their horses up the level without proper fitness or training.

Moral of this story? Do right by your horse, and the eventing community will always support you.

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First Thoughts – The Rest of the Dover Haul

Remember when I was pretending I was going to be all responsible and save my extra gift cards for new breeches? Well… that plan went out the window REAL FAST once I was in an actual tack shop. (Funny how that happens). I ended up going a bit… wild… for me, and I bought things I just generally wanted instead of things I in any way really need. It’s been a long time since I let myself indulge like this, and it felt pretty good. SO WHAT DID I GET?

Flexi Spur Set

So I haven’t even tried these out yet, so have no real opinion on them. I really love my new boots (and will love them more once it’s not winter and I can wear normal pants under them). Unfortunately, I love them so much that I have hesitated putting spurs on them for fear of scratching them. My favorite spurs are… somewhere… I have no idea where, and the spurs I have been using are just little nubs that I am 90% convinced only have a placebo effect.

flexi spur setSo when I spied the spur rack, I immediately wondered if I could find a pair of rubber coated spurs. The rubber coated Stubben ones were $60…. I hemmed and hawed, and then looked at the basket at the bottom. There sat some unobtrusive black and rubber spurs. I liked the length and smoothness of the actual spur, the rubber coated interior, and the price point ($18… including fabric straps.) SOLD.

Then, I got home and mildly panicked that they weren’t legal because they weren’t metal. Here’s the actual rule (bolding is mine):

Spurs are optional for all three tests. Spurs capable of wounding a horse are forbidden. Spurs must be of smooth metal. If there is a shank it must not be longer than 4 cm (1 9/16 inches, measured from the boot to the end of the spur) and must point only towards the rear. If the shank is curved, the spurs must be worn only with the shank directed downwards. Metal or plastic spurs with round hard plastic or metal knobs “Impulse spurs” and “Dummy spurs” with no shank are allowed.

Since these are smooth and not particularly long, I think we are good. Anyone reading this differently? Worst case scenario, I can always change out my spurs for shows, but I like the idea of having the rubberized material stabilizing the spur against my boot.

LeMieux™ X-Grip EuroJump Square Pad in Navy

Alright, this dude is on sale for $130 right now… so it is still above what I typically pay for saddle pads (my white, smartpak branded pads.)

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56970721092__40a8415f-09ab-4146-ba4a-ab7280861807I have wanted something grippy and stock absorbing for XC. I have been using a ECP pad (the ecogold knockoff), and I like it…. but it definitely doesn’t fit quite right under the stubben. (also, if I do end up going to any rated shows, it would be nice to have one pad for SJ and another for XC). I also wanted to have a color with my next pad and NAVY! so YAY!

I rode in it on Tuesday. It seemed to have some shock absorption, but I didn’t feel as disconnected from the saddle as I did with my ogilvy. Everything stayed in place for the short ride, and it fit far better under my 18″ stubben. So far so good! And I am excited to have a fancy pad for things… because that’s important? I told you guys, this haul was not totally rational.

Professional´s Choice® VenTECH™ Contoured Jump Girth

Is this not the worst stock photo you have ever seen? And it’s literally the only photo of this product available… cool guys.

prochoice girth

I have been putting off getting a new girth for May for basically… forever. Her old as dirt SmartPak girth is starting to rust… and since the Stubben has really short billets (and May can hold her breath like no horse I have ever met), it’s also too short. I guess a new girth was somewhat sitting in the back of my mind when we went to look at helmets.

Then, after I put the helmet on the counter… this girth was RIGHT THERE.

First thoughts:

  • I love that the liner removes for easy washing (it was a feature of my old girth that I actually used)
  • The carabiner clip is held flat with a sturdy (seeming) piece of leather. I haven’t played around with this yet, but it’s always a handy feature. (But something I would 100% avoid if May was ever in bar shoes. I don’t care how “safe” it looks at the onset.)
  • The elastic is surprisingly long. I guess this is to keep down the bulk under your leg? In my case, it just made it somewhat easier to get on a fat horse who chooses to be fatter when saddles.
  • Speaking of fat horses, non slip is my friend and non-negotiable.
  • May HATES long leather girths, so I was a bit worried that the stiffer exterior on this one (Dover says it’s a TPU shell? but it just feels like plastic) would bother her. But it is flexible enough to be comfortable, and is better shaped for her forward girth groove than a traditional girth.

After using it on Tuesday, I was pretty pleased with how well it distributes pressure, despite the shape. May seemed to like it as well, and it looks quite nice with my saddle.

Overall, I am pretty happy with my “impulse” purchases at first glance, but I will definitely let you all know how these things age!

Have you bought anything “fun but not totally necessary” lately?

In Need Of Opinions – Helmets

Hello friends! I am on the hunt for a new helmet. The One-K is three years old, and while that is well within the life-span of a helmet, it is starting to look a bit sad. Also, I have no back up helmet laying around for A. Riding in Terrible Weather and B. if I fall off. So, I am looking for some input from all of you! (Keep in mind, my head fits pretty well in a Samshield and about perfectly in a One-K)

1 – Trauma Void™ EQ3™

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Who doesn’t love new technology in equestrian sports? Who in eventing doesn’t love new SAFETY technology?

Enter the Trauma Void. Top Safety Results, and Modern Look. Sounds like a home run!

Buuuut I know other One-K wearers who they just didn’t work for. (looking at you Centered In the Saddle)

 

2 – Charles Owen AYR8® Plus Helmet

COGYR8.JPGSo technically, the study linked above references the Charles Owen AYR8® Leather Look helmet as a “Good Choice”. Buuuuuut I don’t think that one has a removable/washable liner, and after having that feature in a Samshield and my One-K… I just cannot live without it.

The CO is classic for any ring/venue/english discipline. And I think they are flattering on most people. HOWEVER, I am not sure this would come event remotely close to fitting my head.

Honestly… I think that might be it. I could always get another One-K, and I REALLY like my One-K. I could even get the Defender with fun colors. Is there anything that I am missing that I should seriously consider? This is a BIG decision people! 🙂

Bloghop: Favorites of 2018

Big shout out to Amanda for providing inspiration when things are a bit light on the content side of things. I don’t tend to do a lot of year-end wrap ups, so this is right up my alley!

Favorite Show Picture

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PC Bluegrass Equine Photography

Getting back in the show ring this year was a massive goal for me… and we managed to make it to TWO shows and make MAJOR improvements between the two.

Favorite non-Show Picture

Gosh… I did NOT get a lot of media this year…

Favorite Thing You Bought

Well… I didn’t buy it, but the husband bought it for me. That counts, right?

Favorite Moment on Horseback

This whole video…

If I had to pick a picture though… it would be this one. Getting through the water safely was BIG for us. I will admit that our hunter pace this year came in a CLOSE second.

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Favorite Moment Out of the Saddle

Uh yeah… another video. BUT getting to volunteer was something on my list ever since I started eventing. This year, I did it twice. Both times were a GREAT experience. 10/10 highly recommend.

Favorite “Between the Ears” Photo

Do I get multiples? This photo is so representative of how my horsey-life has changed since switching barns. Tons of new friends, and I am rarely at the barn alone. (And May likes the trail riding opportunities)

Favorite Horse Book or Article

Uhhh… I am going blank on this one. I don’t read a lot of horse books, BUT I do read a lot of books that can apply to horses. This year’s stand out book? “Year of Yes” by Shonda Rhimes. It sounds SUPER cheesy, but Shonda is a down to Earth and relatable woman with a fantastic writing style. (not surprising considering she is the creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal and executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder…)

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Favorite Horse Ridden (or groomed/cared for) Aside from Your Own

So… I only rode 2 horses other than May this year. I am going to give this one to Cal,

May’s neighbor. I got to hop on him for some fun, while his mom got on May. Let’s just say, as a 16.2ish OTTB, he was a totally different ride from May, but a really cool horse. Image stolen from the barn’s website, so shoot me. But you can see just how adorable he is!

 

Favorite Funny Picture of Your Horse

Multiple pictures with this one…

My sister and I showing up to the barn to find a free May was one of the funniest moments of the year. So far, the new stall guard SEEMS to have solved the problem.

Favorite Fence that you Successfully Jumped or Movement you Conquered

The water probably should be here. Buuuuuut you all are getting ANOTHER VIDEO! hahaha. This year wasn’t so much about individual fences or elements but about upping the complexity of our exercises at home to produce results at shows. Like this clip from one of our lessons:

Favorite Horse Meme or Funny Picture

Image result for healthy as a horse meme

This wasn’t the exact one I was looking for, but same concept and it gave me a giggle.

Ugh Horse Why?

I wish I had a more elegant title to this post, but this is basically where I am at. Saturday ended up being a decent day weather wise. Sure, it was damp and in the 40s, but it wasn’t actively raining. So I was able to ride in the outdoor. All good things. My plan was to put in a Dressage ride with a focus on connection and bending since May was coming off of back to back jump lessons. (by back to back, I mean lessons on Tuesday and Thursday but no flat ride in between)

The ride started out well. I carried a crop, just in case I needed to reinforce the leg aid, but she was in front of my leg and even a bit spicy. No big deal. We did a lot of walk/halt/walk transitions before stepping into the trot. When we moved into the trot, she threw her right shoulder into my right leg to come off the connection and fling her head up in the transition. UGH.

I brought her back to the walk and tried again. Same result. I halted and asked her to move her right shoulder around in a turn on the haunches. Nope. Nope. Nope. She did not need to do these things, she is a JUMP HORSE now. NOT a DRESSAGE horse. (These pics disagree)

MMMmmmmk. Let’s break it down further. Walk on a small circle and bend her neck around the circle. NOPE. She flung her head up and threw her whole body to the outside, stumbling sideways and flinging her tongue out of her mouth.

Alright, I am thinking… maybe this is physical. Maybe she is pretty sore and stiff from the jump lessons and bending her neck hurts. (Anyone else immediately fall down this rabbit hole?) Then, she saw a horse being ridden over across the field from the other barn. And She Lost Her Mind.

Suddenly, she could bend all the way around to the right, while cantering, to try and see the horse behind her. Any kind of half halt was met with head flinging and tongue wagging. It was 45 minutes of me just trying to get SOME kind of response from her so that I could end on a good note. I ended up just riding her super straight and doing some collected/extended transitions in the trot (where to be honest, she had some moments of actual suspension).

Unfortunately, I still got off feeling frustrated and annoyed. I gave May a proper cool down, put some thrush stuff in her feet (standing in the mud at the hay bale for hours on end is a great recipe for thrush), and used from probios cookies to do some stretches JUST IN CASE.

However, it is one thing to have a really bad ride and have to go back to basics consistently with a horse that has talent. It is another to do it with a horse that is basically a BN horse AND has been a BN horse for 3 years.

I know other people have worse rides. Rides that are genuinely dangerous. This ride wasn’t dangerous. It was just like… (trying to find a not super crude thing to write here)…. it was like writing a post where every time you finished a paragraph, it totally disappears on you.

I think May got Sunday off, so today will be the follow up ride to Saturday. Then, my half leaser is out of town for the holidays, so I have her to myself for a while… and some extra time to actually ride. Maybe the weather will hold out, and we can go on a hack. BUT as Michele knows… it will probably rain.

Anyone else just want to turn their horse out into a field for the rest of winter and hope that Spring is better? (Also, gave up on the new WP editor and went back to the classic. Best decision EVER)

12.11.2018 – Jumping Lesson

It had been MONTHS since my last jumping lesson. Actually, I just looked back and… Yup. It has been FOUR MONTHS… which makes it the fourth jumping lesson of 2018. BUT that also means that I got TWICE as many jumping lesson in during 2018 than I did in 2017. That counts as improvement, right?

I was totally inspired to take this lesson after watching a friend of mine tackle this exercise a week earlier. However, I am sure no one is surprised to find out that thing were a bit rough around the edges. (Also, apologies but the lesson was at night, under the lights, in the cold, and I didn’t want to expose the helmet cam to all of that… so there’s no media)

After warming up, we started trotting through a fan of poles at the end of the ring. It was similar to the exercise below, but there were four poles and they were just on the ground. 

I had a lot of trouble to this going to the left. May really wanted to fall out through her right shoulder, and I felt like I couldn’t quite keep it in the line I wanted. Definitely something to work on. The canter was somewhat better than the trot, but May kept wanting to jam in an extra step before the last pole (keep this in mind). 

Going to the right, the exercise was a lot easier, because all I had to do was regulate how fast her right shoulder came around… a lot easier than trying to pull the right shoulder in and around. 

Next, we started setting the groundwork for the main course. This:

Four verticals, one oxer with 2 placing poles. 

To get May moving forward and get me riding a line (the whole purpose of the above set up), we started with creating a circle from the yellow vertical to the green. In both directions, I messed up either my line or my rhythm the first time, but totally nailed it the second, so we didn’t spend much time on this. 

Then we moved onto the full exercise. The verticals are set exactly 4 strides to the placement poles and the placement poles are one stride from the oxer, so as long as you take a fairly direct line but jump all the elements straight, it is 5 strides from each vertical to the oxer and the oxer to each vertical. 

A couple more notes about what makes this a bit unique. Our ring is not 100% flat. It angles slightly towards the barn, which means that coming towards the barn things are easier than going away from it. This totally becomes relevant, I promise. 

An old pic of the ring. 

NT tells me that I am most likely going to get a forward 6 to the fences and trying for the 5 will likely leave us too unbalanced to do the exercise correctly. Doing 7 will either leave us dead in the water or on too wide a line. I nod, and then immediately tell her that I feel nervous. She gives me a funny look. 

Our first course went in this order: Green, Blue, Red, Orange, Blue, Yellow. I ride the green perfectly with a great pace… Then I take a feel coming towards the oxer, and May adds an extra stride. This means we are kind of dead in the water and we add again to the red… BLAH. I kick on, but the orange and yellow kind of go the same way. NT notes that she liked my pace coming in, but I took my foot off the pedal once I had to actually jump and turn. She’s not wrong. 

We do it again. The Green, Blue, Red combination goes REALLY well, and I am feeling good. BUT remember that the ring slopes down in that direction… I ride the Orange pretty well… and then don’t kick enough towards the oxer. It’s a bit of a stretch for May to get over the placement pole, and instead of stretching AGAIN over the low, wide oxer, she shoves in an extra stride… takes down most of the oxer… I do manage to kick on and get 7 or 8 strides to the Yellow, so we finish… but not in great form. The oxer gets rebuilt, but I can almost feel May losing a bit of confidence here. I am DETERMINED to give her a positive ride. 

We change up the course a bit to keep May from anticipating where we are going. It was SUPPOSED to be Yellow, Blue, Red, Orange, Blue, Yellow. Buuuuut I forgot where I was going at the end, and I end up doing Yellow, Blue, Red, Orange, Blue, Green. 

Why do I forget where I am going? That’s right, because I still can’t get the distance from the Orange to the Blue to work out properly. I close my leg, but May keeps giving me this response like “this is as forward as I will go.” I am not sure if I am having trouble committing, or if she is just used to a different ride from my half leaser, but either way, she is going forward… but she is not in front of my leg. 

“Gallop in a bit like you’re going XC this time.” I nod. I go. I gallop. I jump the orange. I get four PERFECT strides to the placement pole. I close my leg on the fifth stride. The distance and pace are REALLY good. I lean… and May JAMS in an extra stride and jumps pretty much straight in the air. I get thrown up IN FRONT of my saddle and on her neck. My thought? “I can’t afford a new helmet right now.”

Proof that she can stretch for it. 

Luckily, May is still my partner in this whole thing, and she flings her head up, throwing me mostly back into the saddle. I scramble my way back and manage to get her stopped before she carried me over the green. Everyone was very impressed with my save, but I was fully freaked out. May has always been the horse that as long as I have a decent pace, she will safely get us to the other side of the jump. That decision though, was not the safe decision. Honestly, I am still kind of freaked out by it.*

My trainer confirms that everything looked good, but May decided that she needed to make the final decision on that one. Again, a lot of this probably comes back to the fact that it has been 4 months since we had a jumping lesson and this set up was really difficult, but she had really just not been fully responding to my leg all night. I’m not sure who suggested it, but my trainer ran back to the barn to grab me a longer jump crop. Something I could reinforce my leg aid without taking my hands off the reins. 

To test the gas pedal, we went back to the second exercise of just circling from Yellow to Green. It was way better, and I felt like she wasn’t sucking back behind my leg to assess each jump. So we adjusted the exercise again:

As you can see, we were now starting on the line I was having the most difficulty with. ALL I WANTED was to get the first line right. We jumped in, I rode forward, we got 6! I turned to the green. Another 6! I rode forward to 4. Never got straight to it… and got down that line in 5…. Yup, definitely more in front of my leg this time. However, doing the five put us way too off balance for the Orange, so I had to bend it out a bit and I got 7. But it was SO MUCH better with the crop in my hand. May was taking me to the fences again, and I felt like we found our usual groove. She puffed herself up and pranced back to the middle of the ring. 

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NT was also MUCH happier with that performance. For our last course, she just wanted me to do just the Yellow, Blue, Orange line to fix those distance, and then circle back through the fan exercise we had started the day with. (I think she was checking my breaks and balance)

Either way, we nailed the bending line, and May came right back to a perfect dressagey-canter to bounce through the poles and then halted easily to end our ride. 

*I am going to add a note here. May HAS done similar things before when she loses confidence in me. The below video from Kent is a perfect example. After the combination, May was just DONE saving me, so we had a run out. Once I rode better, she went perfectly again. 

Today? I am sore and still feeling a bit back on the heels from the experience. BUT I am super proud of the fact that I didn’t give up in this lesson, and I didn’t decide it was just too hard for us. I kept riding, and I ended the lesson with a much more confident and trusting horse than I started with… even if things got REALLY messy in the interim. I will probably dissect my feelings a bit more in my next post. Until then, have you ever had a lesson that had to hit a pretty low LOW point before ending great?

Off Season – Cross Training

I have a lesson tonight that I am pretty excited about, but I figured I would set the stage with you all with an update of things I am doing outside the barn. Exactly a month ago yesterday, my friend and I joined our local YMCA. And yup – that’s the pic of it above. It is small, clean, and rivals Disney World as one of the friendliest places on Earth. 

Original plan? Take a couple of classes and stay fit and motivated through, what seems to have decided to be a ridiculously cold and unlivable, winter. Reality? Ummm yesterday marked our tenth visit, and that includes me basically taking the week of Thanksgiving off to be with family. 

This is my first experience with really taking classes, and it has been an incredible mix of completely intimating, a bit embarrassing, but totally fun.

Intimidation? When the entire class is there before you get there, and they have 6 pieces of equipment laid out in front of them in some kind of pattern that, even at the end of class, I am not sure I fully comprehended. Oh, and the super pregnant lady who was DEFINITELY lifting twice the weight I was able to, and she looked bored. 

Embarrassment? When the kettleball teacher spent half the class trying to keep me from shrugging my shoulder up past my ear on every lift. Even thinking about it makes my shoulder shrug. 

Fun? Fun was this weekend and CRUSHING my goal. The goal? Do 10 miles in the hour long spin class on Saturday morning. Result? Oh I did 10 miles. In fact, I did 11.4 miles. I also improved my average watts from the mid-40s to 60. I felt like I could push myself and really be a part of the class. 

Left? Second class ever. Right? Saturday. 

The best part? I really think all this cross training is going to have a seriously positive impact on my riding… once mother nature stops torturing us. What about you? Are you doing any cross training or trying something new in the off season?

Putting the Buttons Back On

When I made the decision to partially lease May out, I also made the decision to soften some of May’s buttons. I didn’t want someone else to get on her and have to deal with accidentally pushing buttons they didn’t mean to push. All that could do is end up frustrating both the new rider and May.

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So I trained May to go forward and straight, on the contact. That’s pretty much it. Did it mean that the issue of her not connecting properly to the outside rein going right came back? Yup. Did it also mean that her shoulders mostly stayed in line and she was easy to steer? Yup.

With the half leaser taking her first Dressage lesson tonight with my trainer, I decided to throw those buttons back on and tune them back up. It took about two rides haha.

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Last night, I rode May under the lights of the outdoor for the first time. (Thanks Daylight Savings… more like daylight wasting) She was really good, and I was able to move her body parts all independently. We had a very brief and not at all dramatic discussion about her moving off of my right rein and leg and into my left rein and leg, and that was it.

I sat the trot and got some decent shoulder in and leg yield work. We stepped into the canter. The first canter transition in both directions was fairly lackluster with her definitely leading with her inside shoulder instead of stepping under with the outside hind to push into the canter. I did a quick downward transition, reestablished connection, pushed her shoulder out, asked again, and had a much better transition.

We played with the circle of death set up at one end of the ring, but after about 20 minutes of work, I realized that I had accomplished what I had set out to do. So I hopped off and gave her some cookies. In May’s world, it was a pretty good day!

What about you? Have you ever “untuned” your horse for one reason or another?

Horse Jobs I Wish Could Support My Horse Habit

If wishes were horses… am I right? There is this wonderful idea that seems super prevalent in America that you should “do something you are passionate about.” Honestly, I think such an idea is contributing to the existential crises that most of us 20 – 30 something’s find ourselves in. (I cannot speak for anyone past the age of 30, but my gut feeling is, this may also be true.) Since the age of 14, I have tried to come up with viable ways to WORK at something involving horses while making enough money to AFFORD to own a horse. See what I have come up with:

Professional Horse Shopper

You may laugh because I fully admit that I hate horse shopping. In fact, I didn’t really truly shop when I bought May. Full Story Here. HOWEVER, I really love HELPING other people shop for horses. Just ask a few of my various friends who I have offered more help to then they really want.

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This makes me an expert, right?

I am sure there is a service for the ULTRA rich that involves doing this. It probably also involved connections with top AA show barns, connections in Europe, the ability to speak multiple languages, and probably the willingness to hop on a horse first. Most of which, I do not have and cannot do. (Although, I used to be able to carry a conversation in German).

Plus, my specialty is not in spending 6 figures on anything… other than a house. It is far more in the “find a great bargain at the bottom of dreamhorse where there are no pictures and the use of proper English is questionable.” The problem with this part of the market is, there is rarely extra money for a SUPER thorough PPE… and there definitely isn’t money outside of paying a trainer to find said 4-figure horse.

Independent Saddle Fitter

Let’s be honest here. There is a severe need for independent saddle fitters in the U.S. I live in one of the horse capitals of America (arguably the world), and I have not been able to find a single, really WELL TRAINED, independent saddle fitter.

I looked into it once, and I found out why. It is expensive, time consuming, and risky to become an independent saddle fitter. To really LEARN it, you have to apprentice with someone. Good luck finding a well trained, independent saddle fitter near you to learn from, AND I can almost guarantee you that their margins aren’t good enough to pay an apprentice. So you’d really have to be pretty independently wealthy to go down thispath.

Of course, one could try to supplement their income by buying and selling saddles. But if you make 20% off of each saddle sale (a bit low, but around what I think the service is actually worth), and you sell 4 $1,000 saddles a week. (which is probably too high a rate). You are only making $800 a month… Before taxes. So maybe enough for board after taxes?

Also, let’s say the average saddle fitter charges $300 to come and fit your horse. Just minor flocking or to provide a full consult with wither tracings etc. If you live in a horse-dense area like Louisville, you are probably driving 50 miles a day. In a van, so 15 miles to the gallon? You have to buy that truck too… so that’s an expense. Building good will with trainers and clients probably means a few free or discounted emergency calls. Advertising… a website… equipment… The numbers really don’t add up.

Equestrian Clothing Brand Owner

Workwear

Equestrian Clothing Brands are pretty much everywhere. As riders, we are so amazingly lucky that our sport has finally moved beyond tan breeches, black boots, and polo shirts. While Athleisure has turned yoga clothes into work clothes (in some companies), horse riding gear hasn’t quite gotten that far. How nice would it be to have clothes that can go from boardroom to saddle? (even if the elements of the barn wouldn’t allow you to go from saddle to boardroom without some freshening up)

EVEN BETTER, how about clothes that could do this and come in sizes greater than L or a 30 inch waist.

Classic silhouettes, timeless styles, affordable price point. Face it, when is the last time you spent +$100 on work pants? How about riding pants? How about Riding Pants You could WEAR TO WORK?

Full Time Blogger

This is probably hilarious to most of you reading this blog. I am not someone who has an incredible platform for blogging. I just have a really cute horse and enjoying being a part of the equi-blogging community. I enjoy talking about my horse and horses in general to literally anyone who will listen.

However, I like having my point of view, my voice. I think it is important to talk from a relatable place of being an Adult Amateur with a full time job, a husband, and limited resources. And let’s face it, there is no one banging down my door wishing I would write for them about short, fat, yellow horses. I do own the domain mayaswellevent.com, and it will, one day, be it’s own webpage. But even then, it will be pocket change. I will keep doing it though because I have really enjoyed the journey.

may-as-well-2

What about you? If you could trade your traditional 9-5 for a horsey job, what would you do?

AEC Live – How to Watch

Just an FYI that AEC (American Evening Champtionships) started yesterday. You can watch the whole event FOR FREE at Ride On Video.

Live Scores/Times are available here: Startbox Scoring

Below is the broadcasting schedule, all times are in MDT.

MAIN CHANNEL
(Watch Live Now)

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31st
CROSS COUNTRY

Training 8:30AM – 11:55AM
Preliminary 12:25PM – 2:35PM
Intermediate 3:00PM – 3:40PM
Advanced 4:10PM – 4:55PM

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st
SHOW JUMPING

Training Horse 8:30AM – 8:50AM
Jr. Training 9:10AM – 9:50AM
Training Amateur 10:30AM – 11:10AM
Training Rider 11:30AM – 12:05PM
Preliminary Horse 1:00PM – 1:50PM
Jr./Y.R. Preliminary 2:10PM – 2:35PM
Preliminary Amateur 3:20PM – 3:45PM
Preliminary Rider 4:00PM – 4:10PM
Intermediate 5:00PM – 5:25PM
Advanced 6:30PM – 6:50PM

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2nd
SHOW JUMPING

Novice Horse 8:00AM – 8:25AM
Jr. Novice 8:35AM – 9:15AM
Novice Amateur 10:00AM – 10:55AM
Novice Rider 11:05AM – 11:55AM
Beg. Novice Horse 12:45PM – 1:05PM
Jr. Beg. Novice 1:15PM – 2:15PM
Beg. Novice Amateur 3:00PM – 3:50PM
Beg. Novice Rider 4:05PM – 4:40PM

SECOND CHANNEL
(Watch Live Now)

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st
CROSS COUNTRY

Novice 8:00AM – 12:20PM
Beg. Novice 12:40PM – 4:55PM
Introductory 5:15PM – 5:50PM

THIRD CHANNEL
(Watch Live Now)

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1st
SHOW JUMPING

Festival Training 12:15PM – 1:15PM
Festival Preliminary 2:30PM – 2:50PM

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2nd
SHOW JUMPING

Festival Novice A 9:00AM – 9:40AM
Festival Novice B 9:55AM –  10:35AM
Festival Beg. Novice A 11:45AM – 12:25PM
Festival Beg. Novice B 12:40PM – 1:20PM
Festival Introductory 2:10PM – 2:50PM

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I have no rights to any of this. All broadcasts are the property of Ride On Video LLC.
©2018 Ride On Video LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Any unauthorized reproduction if this broadcast is strictly prohibited by law.