25 More – Blog Hop

Jumping on the blog hop train. L found the questions on Tumblr, and after a few other people chimed in (Amanda & Olivia among others) I just had to join.

1. What is the first thing you do when you get to the barn?

My work is incredibly… non social. I work with a lot of analytical types, so when I get to the barn, I want to actually interact with people. So usually, I seek out the peoples first! haha. I think it gives May a chance to adjust to the reality of having to work again.

2. Is there a breed that you would never own?

Gosh… Probably a paso fino. I LOVE them. When I did Welsh breed shows, they were often around, and they are the COOLEST. However, if we got a gaited horse, it would be something my husband could ride. At 6’6″ish… a paso fino is just too small.

3. Describe your last ride?

Our jump lesson this week! Still on cloud nine from it! Even if all my muscles and joints hate me.

4. Have any irrational riding fears?

Oh so many. Because May isn’t the MOST athletic, I am convinced that we will miss big to an oxer one day, and we will both get seriously injured. Clearly… that fear is pretty unfounded at the heights I have any interest in.

img_1985

5. Describe your favorite lesson horse?

Oh definitely Buddy. I rode him on and off for like… a decade. So much love for that little thoroughbred. Because of him, I will never rule out owning an OTTB.

6. Would you ever lease out your horse?

Yeah. I probably will when Matt and I start a family. I think she would be a great horse for a pony club kid to play around with.

7. Mares: Yay or neigh?

Uh duh… hahaha. I have ridden and loved MANY mares. If they are smart mares, I tend to really enjoy them.

8. How many time per week do you get to see your horse?

I shoot for five days… which means that I typically make it there 4 days a week.

9. Favorite thing to do on an “easy day” with your pony?

Trail rides. We both love just wandering around wherever. It’s been a while since I hopped on bareback. Maybe I will this week. 🙂

img_1329

10. Conformational flaw that bothers you the most?

Ahahahaha…. well, my horse is kind of a conformation train wreck. That being said, a horse that is downhill would be pretty tough for what I want to do. Cantering downhill to a Novice oxer on something downhill? Just doesn’t sound fun to me, and I think it makes Dressage miserable for everyone

May Jump911. Thing about your riding that you’re most self conscious about?

My weight. I feel like being on the bigger side of the rider spectrum makes every flaw so much more noticeable.

12. Will you be participating in no stirrup November?

I actually dropped my stirrups this weekend for a while. I am not sure if I will totally leave my stirrups in November because I don’t think that’s fair to May. But I will definitely increase my focus on it.

13. What is your grooming routine?

Curry all over, brush with a hard brush, maybe a soft brush… wipe down with fly wipes. Pick feet. Either apply durasole or keratex depending on what we are dealing with. If I have time or before a lesson, I brush out her tail.

14. Describe a day in the life of your horse?

She gets night turnout. So she comes in for breakfast typically in the late morning. She hangs out in her stall in the afternoon. I ride in the early evening. Then she gets fed dinner and turned back out for the night. Most days, she spends less than 6 hours in a stall, which I LOVE.

View this post on Instagram

Lets roll CLOSER to the fence. 🙄🙃🤷🏻‍♀️

A post shared by Emily (@may_as_well_event) on

15. Favorite season for riding?

I love the fall. Part of it is the weather, as it tends to be beautiful in KY. But a lot of it is how we feel in the fall. After a full season of lessons, hacking out, XC schoolings, shows etc, we feel pretty solid and in sync in summer. May is always super fit, and it’s just a really fun time of year for us.

16. If you could only have 1 ring: indoor or outdoor?

Outdoor. Always outdoor. I ride in the indoor at my barn so rarely, and I would probably ride in it even less if the outdoor was bigger. When we were at our old barn, I only rode in the indoor when it was too dark to ride outside (no lights).

17. What impresses you most about the opposite discipline (english vs. western)?

I think its incredible how quarter horse people have been able to breed these SUPER specialized horses with incredible instincts. Like cutting horses or western pleasure horses. It’s really interesting to me.

No photo description available.
My Wenglish Attempts lol

18. You have unlimited funds to buy one entire tack set for your horse, what is he/she wearing?

Oh gosh. I don’t even know. May is such special body type, that I think finding the saddle would be the biggest issue… even with a huge budget. Can I just go with custom everything that actually fits her? lol

19. How many blankets do you have? When do you blanket?

She has 4. A sheet, two mediums, and a heavy with a hood. I have two mediums because they tend to get the most wear in our climate. Especially since I just do a bib clip. We blanket when it gets cold? lol. May is a yak, so her tolerance for cold is pretty high, and she had a round bale in her field at night. However, we also get a lot of wet, so the blankets are more used to keep her dry and comfortable.

20. What is your horse’s favorite treat? Favorite place to be scratched?

Everything? Awkwardly, I think she loves probios cookies the most. Go figure. At this point, if I don’t cross tie her, she will creep towards my tack trunk when I go over there, hoping for a cookie. Confession time: I know it’s a bad habit.. but it’s cute so I don’t correct it. Oops.

As for scratches, she likes the inside of her ears rubbed and her tail. But only on her terms. When she is done with you, she would rather you just not. Ok?

21. Something about your barn that drives you crazy?

Gosh. Sometimes it is a damn zoo hahaha. We have horses and kids and dogs and a cat. It can be a lot, so I have learned what times/days are a bit quieter. At the same time, I really love all the activity and May just EATS it up. I think we both prefer it to all the nights we spent alone at my old barn.

May Jump2

22. Roached manes, pulled manes, or long flowing manes?

I actually really prefer pulled manes, but May hates having her mane pulled. I really do think it is painful for her. I decided to roach to save her from that experience and because she gets SO HOT in the summer, a roached mane helps her stay cool.

23. Can you handle a buck or a rear better?

I used to be able to sit a buck, but honestly, it has been a while… I rode a couple of horses that rear, and I could ride it… but it’s not fun.

24. I would never buy a horse who ___________________?

Reared haha. I am with Amanda on this one. It is a deal breaker for me. It is just too dangerous.

25. Favorite facial marking?

Oh I love snips. Just too cute for words.

If you made it this far, you get a shameless plug to please buy my Dressage saddle. 😉
Ebay Link

Advertisements

My Complicated Relationship with Showing

Warning in advance – most of these videos are VERY OLD and of VERY POOR quality with annoying music. Mute and watch at your own discretion haha.

I have been showing basically since the beginning of my riding career. My first horse show couldn’t have been that long after I first started riding. The plan was simple: a walk/trot class at a schooling show at my barn.

I have it in my head that the show was only an “in barn” one, but who knows if that was true at this point. I don’t think I had a riding coat or any of the special “stuff”, so it must have been pretty casual. I really don’t remember much from that show, other than the horses.

Shortly before that show, the barn lost the horse I had been riding. The only horse I had ever really ridden. A quick plan was made to have me ride another school horse (who I did poorly on), but it was then that my complicated relationship started. Somehow, my first experience with death and loss coincided with my first horse show.

I moved barns and the next few years were filled with “horse shows” at the end of each week of horsey summer camp. I even remember a quick 4H show when I was maybe 12? I don’t remember much other than SPEED… in a hunter class. Needless to say, the barely schooled pony I rode in his first ever show was not competitive.

I did not really learn how to horse show, but I did learn how to ride green and rank horses of all shapes and sizes. I changed barns again, wanting to get more experience and more opportunities to ride. A small barn 15 minutes from my house seemed perfect!

Sunny
One of my first hunter paces… where my love for XC was born.

I still rode green horses, but I started to show more.

Hamlet

And you know what I remembered most from those days? Blackness. The kind of blackness where no sound, light, or feelings get in. Why do I remember blackness? Because I remember being SO TERRIFIED that I held my breath around my course of 8 cross-rails. Because my ability to ride the pants off anything at home did not translate to even an IOTA of success in the show ring.

The barn I was at changed a bit and had more of a focus on showing Welsh ponies. Again, I rode the green beans. But now, it was in whatever rail classes I qualified for. I went years without showing over fences. I did fairly well, all things considered. I learned how to get a horse to “show off” on the flat, how to hide the spook, and how to alleviate tension.

I wanted to get back into jumping… so I moved to a hunter jumper barn. I rode slightly more broke horses, and through pure repetition. The tension started to go away. I rode a really lovely little bay thoroughbred, and he taught me so much.

Bud, however, decided that jumping wasn’t really his thing anymore, and I switched to a gorgeous Chestnut mare… with one of the biggest bucks I have ever ridden. I showed more.

When she got hurt, I took the ride on a total pocket rocket of a pony. I learned to do the jumpers, and honestly, I LOVED the jumpers. The tension for perfection went away, and I just rode.

View this post on Instagram

#tbt #cowgirl #jumpers #whenicouldride

A post shared by Emily (@may_as_well_event) on

When the chestnut mare was ready to start again, we figured her sassy attitude would be fine in the jumper ring, so that’s where we went… and frustration and fear started to set in again. I never knew what I was going to get. I couldn’t move up. My riding stagnated. I figured it was just the result of college, so I pledged to get back at it when I graduated.

I graduated, and as a very generous birthday gift from my dad, I got to go horse shopping. I saw a lot of lame… and a lot of crazy. My budget was HUGE for a 22 year old… but tiny for the hunter jumper world. “I’ll just get a jumper type that could maybe cross into the equitation classes.”

I found Winston. On paper? Perfect. 16.2 Quarter Horse type. Sweet as sugar. And tense as anything I had ever sat on. I have time. I thought. I have patience. What I didn’t have was a cool head in the show ring…

We never made it further than the lowest of the low classes. Trust broke down. I tried to move him to an eventing barn (since he was WONDERFUL out of the ring), but the combination of us together was miserable. Rides ended with tears and my habit of not breathing while on course came back. Tense rides turned into complete meltdowns for both of us.

I cried more, and I put him up for sale. I had a plan. I wouldn’t buy anything. I would just enjoy being horseless for a while… ride some school horses… learn to event on something more made. Instead, I was faced with the proposal to trade Winston for May. Obviously, I bought May… but I figured I would just do what I was good at (putting on miles at home) and then sell her.

I owned her for a few weeks… and we took her to her first show. It was even a combined test! I remember riding with my trainer to the show, asking her how to do a Dressage test… because I had never done one.

It was the first show I actually enjoyed since riding Cowgirl more than five years earlier, and I learned that horse shows aren’t about having the most talented horse… or winning ribbons.. or laying down a perfect trip. Horse shows are about competing with a horse you love.

GallopOn

GIF Name Game

After Hillary posted this fun name game… I just couldn’t resist doing it for May. Don’t worry, 2019 goals are coming but today needed a fun break kind of post.

Let’s start with the name May had when I met her… Krimpet. To be fair, she is totally a TatyKake

Krimpet
Epic Fail

mmmmmmmk. Great start. So Then I tried her show name when I got her: Too Many Cupcakes…

There is definitely some reference here I am missing… anyone watch Adult Swim and can fill me in?

Let’s just say… May is not the kind of mare to be shining rainbows and hearts out of her hooves…

Apparently, she was once even called Delilah:

I’ve seen this face from her many times….

Delilah was of course short for “Hey There Delilah”

A fat mare named Delilah… Poor girl…

So when I got May… in May… She got the name May… Yup, Super Original.

OMG WHY ISN’T HER SHOW NAME “It’s Gunna Be May!”… Missed that opportunity

Finally, we have May’s show name “May as Well”… and I had to laugh when I saw it:

First of all, I had many people try to correct me that the phrase is “Might as well” not “May as well”… but Might would have been a terrible name for this horse.

However, my favorite part is the fact that this GIF totally encompasses May’s thought process. If you’re not going to take charge, she will totally start making decisions for you.

Hope this was fun! Serious, 2019 Goals post is in the works!

Blog Hop: 25 Questions

Not a lot going on so far this week, so Amanda’s 25 Questions blog hop came at the absolute best time. Let’s get into it!

Why horses? Why not a sane sport, like soccer or softball or curling?

I dont think there has ever been a question of me doing anything else. Sure, I played soccer until high school and then a bit for fun in college. I played softball until middle school… I am sure I played a bunch of other random sports in between. (does marching band count?) However, I have always needed horses to keep me sane. Just ask the hubs.

What was your riding “career” like as a kid?

I guess my “kid” time can be broken into my experience at two different barns. One was a small barn, under a dozen horses. I did everything there from teach at summer camp to riding potential lesson horses. All the rules were broken when we hopped on horses straight off a truck from Mexico and jumped them over barrels in a round pen. Seriously…

DarlaI showed welsh ponies and cobs as a young jr. Typically they were really young 3 – 5. I helped break one or two of them. One I have kept tabs on, and he has gone on to show 3rd level dressage. Cool dude. One day, I will get myself a cob/thoroughbred or warmblood cross. If wishes were horses.

In my later teens, I rode at a hunter jumper barn. I went to exactly one A rated show, but I groomed at helped out at some of New York’s most classic h/j venues: HITS, Old Salem, etc. I still rode anything under the sun, but definitely also developed all the bad habits that come along with riding or unpredictable green horses. There was one horse that I rode on and off for almost 10 years. When I broke my hand, he was the one I got on first.

If you could go back to your past and buy ONE horse, which would it be?

Ugh Boo. Without a doubt, Boo. This is not my photo, nor me riding, so I blurred out the rider’s face. This was… many years ago, so before Facebook was a thing for high schoolers (or middle school?), no idea how old I was at the time.

Boo

Anyway, Boo was an  Irish Sport Horse. He is BY FAR the most athletic horse I have ever ridden. He was the type that, if you pointed him at the fence to stop, he would happily jump over it and just keep going. I wonder now what it would be like to ride him with all the tools I now have in my toolbox (and as an eventer).

I would love to own something like him now, but I doubt I would ever be able to afford it! I kept tabs on him for a bit after he left. He ended up owned by a vet in southern NJ.

What disciplines have you participated in?

Western Pleasure, English Pleasure, Pleasure Driving, Eventing, Hunter Jumpers, Dressage…

western

Most of my experience pre-late teens was more at generalist english barns.

What disciplines do you want to participate in some day?

Reining would be super cool. I think there is a barn around here.

Have you ever bought a horse at auction or from a rescue?

Nope. I have only ever owned 2 as an adult, and one as a kid.

What was your FIRST favorite horse breed – the one you loved most as a kid?

Welsh Cobs. Hands down.

If you could live and ride in any country in the world, where would it be?

Probably Germany. I used to speak fluent German, and I just love the country. The UK would be a close second. img_4053

Do you have any horse-related regrets?

I’ve stayed at a few barns longer than I should’ve. I also regret not being able to put as much time and training into May and myself as I have wanted to the past couple of years. We should be going Novice, but now I am not sure that we will get there together.

If you could ride with any trainer in the world, ASIDE from your current trainer, who would it be?

Right now? Mary Wanless. I think bio-mechanics would make a big difference in some challenges I have had in all three phases.

What is one item on your horse-related bucket list?

A traditional 3 day event format. Even at BN, I think it would be an incredible learning experience.

If you were never able to ride again, would you still have horses?

Honestly, I am not sure. I would probably still be involved in horses, and May wouldn’t go anywhere. But horses can be incredibly emotionally draining.

What is your “biggest fantasy” riding goal?

Right now? Training level hahahaha. Although, one day I will probably switch to pure dressage.

What horse do you feel like has taught you the most?

My horse life has always been kind of a collage of horses. I could say Sport – the broken down quarter horse who was so terrified on cross ties that he visibly shook the first time I worked with him. He turned into a very dependable 2′ horse.

Buddy3

I could say my friend’s horse Henry, who was by far the best trained horse I have ever sat on. I should probably say the horse I owned before May. He taught me a lot about myself, my passion, and how to let go of something that just isn’t working.

If you could change one thing about your current horse/riding situation, what would it be?

I would have more time and money…. Isn’t that true for everyone? hahaha

If you could compete at any horse show/venue in your home country, where would it be?

The Kentucky Horse Park is still on my wish list. Hopefully, I can make it a reality in 2019!

If you could attend any competition in the world as a spectator, what would be your top choice?

Burghley.

Have you ever thought about quitting horses?

Yes. Many times. My original plan was to sell my previous horse and take a break before going shopping again. The universe had other ideas.

If you could snap your fingers and change one thing about the horse industry, what would it be?

Everyone would be more concerned about horse welfare than money and fame.

What’s the dumbest horse-related thing you’ve done that actually turned out pretty well?

Hah… buying May. I am amazed everyday I ride her at how cool she has become.

As you get older, what are you becoming more and more afraid of?

I want to say jumping, but I am not sure that is true. I have been so out of practice with my jumping that it is not fair to say that fear is growing with age. I would have to say now that it is probably riding horses that I am unfamiliar with. I used to climb on EVERYTHING and ANYTHING. (how about some REALLY old video for fun… you probably want the sound off)

What horse-related book impacted you the most?

Go ahead and laugh, but I don’t really read/listen to horse books. And I read A LOT. So… Black Beauty?

What personality trait do you value most in a horse and which do you dislike the most?

I really like a thinking horse. I am not sure everyone does, but I want my horse to give me their opinion. It tells me they are engaged and actively thinking in their work, even if I don’t always appreciate their opinions.

I cannot stand horses that want to hurt their rider. If you have never been on one, count your lucky stars. I got on a friend’s horse one day. He was incredibly talented, but I rode him halfway around the arena and a walk and then got off.

What do you love most about your discipline?

I would love to say that I love that no one cares what horse you’re riding, that it is more about ability than aesthetics. But honestly? It’s not really true in eventing. SURE, no one cares if you are riding a thoroughbred vs. a warmblood, but I have definitely gotten some disparaging comments about May.

So I will say that I love the challenge. I love that I am competing against myself. My goals are independent of those around me and directly related to things I can control. And ride times. I LOVE ride times.

What are you focused on improving the most, at the moment?

Strength and fitness. Officially down 15.5 lbs (don’t laugh, I am proud of that .5) and definitely starting no stirrup november tonight.

Behind the Stall Door With: May As Well

When I found myself at a loss for topics for today, Tracy came through with inspiration. Then, Olivia joined in on the hop to officially make it a party. If you haven’t checked out their versions yet, do that first!

Behind The Stall Door With: All I Need

Behind the Stall Door with: To Be Frank

The partnership between Emily O’Leary and her horse, May as Well, began about as unconventionally as any horse partnership could.

“I was debating just selling my current horse and taking a break for a while. No matter what though, I knew I wanted a plain bay gelding.” Emily admitted, before continuing. “Then, I drunkenly made a trade offer on the internet for a short, yellow mare named Krimpet.”

It turns out, that their first ride wasn’t even that magically. “Oh, I couldn’t steer at all, and we didn’t jump anything higher than maybe 12″. My first thought was that she would probably easier to sell then my current horse.”

img_3668

However, the two have stuck it out and entered the sport of eventing together. Going from W/T tests and crossrails up to a recognized horse trial at the Beginner Novice level. Let’s open up the stall door and learn more!

May Really Didn’t Steer

While there definitely were videos of May navigating around courses in her sale ad, it didn’t immediately translate to her new role as Emily’s mount. “During our first lesson, she tried to run out of the arena, and she couldn’t make a 30M circle.” It was a steep learning curve, where May learned that life was just easier when she went along with whatever crazy thing Emily asked her to do.

May Coggins Photo
First Coggins Photo! She NEVER gets this dirty anymore. 

She Was Always Show Perfect

At May and Emily’s first competition together, they did an elementary level combined test. “I remember being terrified because the warm up for SJ was in an open field, and I hadn’t yet ridden May in an open field.” Emily had nothing to worry about, as May was a total pro.

 

May Field Jump.jpg

She Has Some Non-Negotiables

May is pretty laid back about everything. Does that new OTTB need a horse to pony off of? May will do it. Did the new dog at the barn just do a zoomies through May’s feet while she’s on the cross ties? She probably didn’t even wake up. However, there are two things that May simply cannot handle.

 

May Walk.jpg

Fly spray is best delivered through wipes, thank-you-very-much. May lets all her handles know through snorting, wide eyes, and prancing in place that the act of heedlessly spraying her with STUFF is not to be tolerated. Meanwhile, clippers should be avoided at all costs, unless they come with cookies at LEAST the quality of Mrs. Pastures Cookies for Horses. Sugar free substitutes will not be tolerated.

She Is Often Underestimated

It has been assumed that May is a Dressage-only horse, a companion horse, and a retired broodmare before. She will sleep on the cross ties, wander around on the trails, and sunbathe while other school XC fences around her. However, when it is time to go to work, she is all business. As one Equine Dentist once said, “Wow, she really gets up there. You wouldn’t think that just looking at her.”

You might not know it just looking at her, but those that have ridden her have never forgotten it.

Blog Hop: The Horse You Bought

After seeing Olivia’s blog post on “The Horse You Bought”, I hopped on over to Two and Half Horses, where the hop originated. Since it has been nearly three and a half years, I figured it would be fun to look back. I have zero media from our first trial ride, but I do have the wording of her ad:

Belgian/QH cross….UTD on everything. Has been shown and placed well at larger shows! Jumps up to 3′ courses. Trail rides alone and in a group, crosses water, trailers well… Literally does nothing wrong. Easy enough for an advanced beginner to handle!

To be honest, our first trial ride was not some beacon of hope where the clouds parted and angels sung. I could barely keep her on the rail, and at the canter, we basically careened around wherever she wanted to go. She leaned so badly that I was concerned she would trip and go down. The trot had no rhythm, and my first thoughts were “I could sell her as a trail horse for as much as I was paying” and “she’d be easier to sell than my c current horse.”

Seriously… so many people have this amazing AHAH moment when they buy a horse, like buying a wedding dress. BUT I didn’t have that. I had “this will probably work” and “I just need to ride something different.” She had really no personality and any jump we took that day was under 2′, and we got to it sideways. With all those romantic images in my head, I loaded her onto the trailer with a smile on my face anyway. Pure joy? Maybe not. Relief and terror? Probably more so that.

img_3940
Hilarious part? I still have this ENTIRE outfit except the breeches.

She was sort of easy to load (once food was involved), and we took her home. Then, I attempted to get a beauty shot of her at home, and I got this.

img_2414
And I wondered for a moment what I had done…

My first lesson? She couldn’t do a 20M circle and ran out the gate of the arena. Our canter transitions took more than a dozen trot steps, and my saddle really didn’t fit.

img_3973
And this was as good as our trot got. 

May was a lot greener than even I had anticipated, and I had ridden A LOT of green horses. I had started a couple horses from scratch, and this was even more difficult than that. There were moments of real promise… and moments where I couldn’t even figure out what was causing everything to go Oh So Wrong.

During one of these moments, I turned to my trainer at the time and just told her I was completely stumped. I knew we weren’t straight, thorough, or forward, but I couldn’t seem to get any of those things to work together. That day, I paid for my first pro ride on my horse, and it seriously helped us move forward.  I wish I had more media from those first few months because they were… not friendly to me.

img_4177
We added to her education with gymnastics and formal XC schools

I think this was our first “course” together:
Video Link

Overall, she was green but a fun horse to work with and every ride was engaging… even when I was mostly failing at accomplishing anything.

Fast Forward to 2018?

May has proven herself to be a really reliable partner. I have spent COUNTLESS hours ALONE riding at different barns. We have seen deer, bicycles, strollers, small children, quads, and, most recently, sheep together. We have done horse trails, Dressage, SJ, XC, clinics, hunter paces, trail rides, games days, and many bareback rides together.

May has been the horse my friends get on to ride something “other than a schoolie” before they set off horse shopping. She is also the horse that has, in slow motion, run away with more than one person in the arena. (never faster than a medium trot, just without willingness to walk)

We even did our first BN together… Which wasn’t the smoothest… But we got it done.

 

Her personality has come out of her shell. While naughty is probably never the right word, opinionated is probably a better one. She has broken cross ties, simply because she was hungry. She had decided that certain farriers should not be allowed to work on her precious toes. AND she has learned how to express to me when she feels a saddle does not fit to her standards (crow hopping).

However, now, I wouldn’t trade her for the world… Although, I could still definitely sell her for more than I bought her for!

3 Years With The Corgi Horse

Three years ago, my trainer and I drove to PA with one horse in the trailer. He was tall, handsome, and as athletic as I could ever need. We returned with a short, kind of strangely built, corgi horse (and me with a lighter wallet).

It was probably a trade that made no sense. My old horse was easily jumping around Novice courses. He was brave, flashy, and even registered, but our relationship was in tatters. I had very few rides that didn’t end in tears, and he was just as miserable.

May (then known as Krimpet aka Too Many Cupcakes) was about as green as any horse I had ever ridden. Steering was optional, rhythm didn’t exist, and we needed about 20 – 30 trot steps to get the canter. However, she was clearly brave, smart, and pretty unflappable. In the end, that was all I needed. I loaded her into the trailer, shrugged at my trainer, and said, “If it doesn’t work out, someone will want her as a trail horse.” In fact, the below was the best pics we could get of her the first day:

img_3940-1

img_2414

It’s been three years, and I can pretty confidently say that it worked out. (And I’ve gotten a lot better at photographing her)

Blog Hop: What I Didn’t Know I Didn’t Know

Big thanks for Olivia for some blogspiration. She recently posted this topic on her blog, and I just had to tackle the idea!

Apparently, I am having a bit of a throwback week this week. (sorry, not sorry). I am going to go back a few years, to just before I bought my first horse. Let’s call it, “5 things I didn’t know I didn’t know about owning a horse”.

1. This is your responsibility only.

This one seems obvious right? You’re buying a horse and that horse is your responsibility.  However, it really comes down to how it is YOUR responsibility ONLY. Your trainer, barn manager, and friends may all be incredible resources for you on this journey, but this horse’s training, happiness, welfare, and health all fall on your shoulders. Be ready to educate yourself beyond your core group.

Buddy1

2. You will feel guilty, and that is ok.

Shocking to no one, owning a horse is expensive. Owning a horse you want to train and compete is VERY expensive. I have always made enough money to support my horse habit, and I have always responsibly reined back my expectations for myself and my horse when funding just didn’t cover my goals. However, it is still expensive. Even spending the bare minimum, I still often feel guilt. I should be riding more, doing more, succeeding more.

Horses don’t work that way though. Just enjoy what you are doing, make sure you aren’t spending beyond your  means, and remember that a horse doesn’t care if it has the newest, fanciest anything. She really just wants a carrot.

3. You will fail, and it will make you better.

Failure in horse ownership takes so many paths. I have failed to prepare my horse properly for a competition. I have failed to recognize the signs of ulcers. I have failed to call the vet immediately for an injury that I thought was minor that turned out to need more extensive help. I even failed to make my first horse into what I hoped he would be. Now, however, I am a more educated horse owner, rider, and trainer, and every horse I touch is better off because of it.

Winston1

4. You will succeed.

I recently downloaded a mood tracker on my cell phone. I wanted a better sense of what impacts my moods (food, caffeine, hormones, etc.). Most of my ratings hang out in the middle of the scale, kind of like a Dressage test. There are lots of 5’s and 6’s and 7’s, even the occasional 4. However, after my first lesson of the season, I pulled out a 10. I was beyond myself. I called my husband just to word vomit to him all the amazing things I did with my horse in 28 minutes. I get the same high after a great horse trial and, sometimes, even after that perfect Dressage transition.

5. Ignore the Rail birds

Rail birds take all forms. They are the catty teenagers (and adults!) on the sidelines at show that feel the need to comment on your troubles. (Fun fact, it is not fun to watch the video after a rough SJ round and hear this commentary in the background.) There are friends and trainers that will try to put you into a box surrounded by what you “should” and “should not” do. There are COUNTLESS people on the internet that will love to critique your position, horse, tack, weight, and more. These people don’t matter. The beauty of riding, and eventing in general, is that this is a sport of you and your horse. Buy the horse you want to ride everyday, and then go out and ride it whenever you can.

Hamlet

After 6 years of horse ownership, I have grown a ridiculous amount, and I know I still have so much to learn. What about you? Do you have any advice for yourself prehorse ownership?

A Throwback Fail!

It probably would’ve been best to post this on Thursday to make it a #TBT (ThrowbackThursday) post, but I just couldn’t resist sharing.

Nearly 10 years ago, a friend of my mom asked for some help getting her QH back into shape. He was a cute dude, and he lived in the barn in her backyard with one other horse. She was fairly timid, and he has been out of work. As I always did at that age, I eagerly hopped on. After trotting around leisurely for a while, I asked him to pick up a canter…

 

Ouch… I remember that one hurting. I was trying to be nice, given that he was pretty out of shape. A loose rein, up off his back, and gentle aids. After he put me in the dirt, he was put into the contact and asked to really work. He was wonderful after that… but I was always a bit wary of him. I think I only ended up riding him another couple of times before show seasons picked up and then heading off to college in the fall. Although, I do remember feeding and deicing water buckets for her in the winter.

Honestly, the above probably wasn’t this guy’s fault. (I think his name was Buddy.) He was out of shape and a round-type to start with, so I can pretty much guarantee you that the saddle he had on didn’t fit him right. Now, I would have checked the saddle fit before getting on, but back then, I really didn’t know much, if anything, about saddle fit. Buddy also had a wonky right front foot that, even then, I didn’t think the farrier was handling in the best way.

Live and learn people!

Also – Olivia at DIY Horseownership is having an Easter Contest/Giveaway! I can’t wait to see everyone’s pictures. You can check it out here: https://diyhorseownership.com/easter-contest-and-giveaway/

Thankful Thursday

Amidst all the driving back and forth to the barn, I have had an opportunity to reflect on what I am more thankful for in my riding career. However, the thing I am most thankful for, is the mare that turned out to be much more than she was ever supposed to be.

I have talked a lot in the past about how May was a complete impulse buy. You can read the full story here: A May As Well Purchase However, I am not really sure I ever explained what I was expecting. Originally, when I bought her home, we joked that I had overpaid for her. After all, she couldn’t even do a 20M circle before she popped her shoulder and ran in the opposite direction, a canter took nearly 20 steps of trot to pick up, and I quickly learned that she had never seen a gymnastic.

To be honest, my original thought for buying her was that, if she didn’t work out, I could recoup most of my money and just sell her as a trail horse. She was sane, and sensible, and had color. All the things trail people want. Right? I mean, she could comfortable carry a larger rider for miles without discomfort. Then, we went to our first CT. It was a W/T Dressage Test and 18″ stadium round.

And we had SO MUCH FUN. She was a champion, and I finished with a giant smile on my face. I was hooked on competing this horse, and I think the man in this situation finally understood what it was all about. She never was supposed to be as cool as she is, but gosh… she is really cool…

 

I think she has turned out to be really cool… And I can’t wait to see what more she has to show me.